Latest News

The Global Alliance for Public Relations and Communication Management (GA) seeks a young communication professional preferably full time or two...
Academic achievements for research and education across Europe honoured  by international association of communication scholars   The...
The UN Global Compact welcomes today's adoption by the European Council of the Directive on disclosure of non-financial and diversity...
«  
  »
M T W T F S S
 
1
 
2
 
3
 
4
 
5
 
6
 
7
 
8
 
9
 
10
 
11
 
12
 
13
 
14
 
15
 
16
 
17
 
18
 
19
 
20
 
21
 
22
 
23
 
24
 
25
 
26
 
27
 
28
 
29
 
30
 
31
 
 
 
 
Add to calendar

Leading and Leadership

May 28, 2014

 

Anne Gregory, Global Alliance Chair

In the last few months it has been my privilege to speak at a number of events in various places throughout the world. I’m struck by the differences in our practice as local conditions require different emphases, but I’m also constantly reminded of the similarities. The effects of globalisation and technological change mean that the opportunities and challenges that face us are surprisingly similar.

 

There is one topic that I’m asked to talk about more than any other and which always arises at every event and that is leadership. There are usually two tracks to the discussion. The first is, why is it that our profession still isn’t recognised as a core leadership discipline given the changes shaping our world have communication at their heart? The key to the answer here is that three attributes need to be present for us to have that recognition: first, a profound understanding of our strategic role; second, excellence in planning (and evaluating) our work; and third, demonstrating leadership behaviours. 

The second track is about what shape that leadership should take when we are asked to be leaders. There are two parts to this question: what does the leader of a first class public relations/communication management function look like? And what does a leader of an organisation who has public relations/ communication management specialism look like? It is this last question that normally generates the most debate. Some of the debate is about the different management cultures around the world and the need to have an understanding of that. But again, there is a sense that there are some common requirements of this role, some of which we know, like for example, an ability to keep a long-term view.

 

Leadership is one of the main topics of discussion at the forthcoming World Public Relations Forum in Madrid, Spain in September this year and to ensure we capture the richness of thinking on leadership we are looking at a number of themes. Martina Gmür of the World Economic Forum will be sharing with us their thinking on the subject. We’re asking for your thoughts on this too. Earlier this month we sent a survey to the leaders of the world’s public relations and communication management associations asking for their opinions on the matter and we would like to broaden that out to capture the full range of thinking of those people interested in the topic. We’ve put together a very short and easy to complete questionnaire and would welcome your contribution.

 

There is no doubt that organisations and society needs the skills and knowledge of public relations leaders and I’m very much looking forwards to a rich debate on this in Madrid. From this we will develop a ‘legacy’ that will point the way to our contribution and which, like the Stockholm Accords and the Melbourne Mandate before it, will help to shape our profession into the future. Please join the discussion.