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PRII conference told story-telling across different mediums is the future for both news organizations and PR practitioners

May 21, 2013

 

Leading figures in the Irish PR industry gathered in Dublin in April for PR at the Media Crossroads, the theme of this year’s Public Relations Institute of Ireland’s (PRII) annual conference. 

 

This year, speakers focused on the intertwined relationship between journalism and public relations, and examined the challenges facing the PR industry as both media and audiences become increasingly fragmented and brands struggle to reach customers and other stakeholders.   

 

As consumers transform from being passive receivers to active participants, the use of social media has become key. This is true not only for PR practitioners it would appear, but for traditional Irish media too as they evolve into ‘news organisations’ telling stories through print, audio, video and social media platforms such as Twitter and Facebook.      

 

Research from the Centre for the Study of Media, Power and the Public – who presented at the conference – suggests, however, that while social and traditional media both produce a torrent of information on a daily basis, people nonetheless still prize accurate news from trusted sources. This means that media companies will have to find ways of paying for quality journalism and we are likely to see a growth in metered pay walls.

 

How will this impact PR? Only time will tell. In the meantime, while there are now myriad opportunities to engage with journalists and media outlets, PR practitioners would do well to remember that in this new landscape all tweets and posts – be they official or otherwise – should be viewed as mini press-releases. Organisations should therefore have clear policies in place across their entire employee base to ensure opportunities are seized and problems mitigated.

 

PR at the Media Crossroads was sponsored by Kantar Media Ireland.